add
add
Menu

The War Camaro has Stealth Properties

ad14

The story begins when Helge Meyer, an officer with the Danish Special  Forces retired from the military and went home to Germany after Dessert Storm in 1991. A chance meeting there of Helge and an American G.I  led to an invitation to visit the Rhine Main Air Base commander a few weeks later. The two had discussion the plight of citizens in the Balkins and how they could help improve life for them. The Commander was also interested in a special project to help in Bosnia -Herzegovina by supplying medical, food or any other necessary items to improve the life of the children, the elderly and others in need, though-out war torn country. Helge readily agreed, and his Camaro was then specially outfitted by Air Force mechanics to a vehicle that will get the job done.

capture capture1

The Camaro carries no weapons, but does have a 400 kg cargo carrying capacity. Just as importantly as cargo, Helge  must avoid the well equipped thugs, bandits, rebels or marauders of any other name that roam freely throughout the land. .This car has stealth properties, allowing Helge to travel virtually undetected and undetectable in the war torn area. The vehicle has all the safety plus avoidance systems available from the military although the upgrades are too numerous to list here.  A few of the modifications include-bullet proof Kevlar lined panels, Kevlar covered trunk,  infrared absorbing paint, mine pusher on the front bumper, foam filled "no-flat" tires, body armour, steel plate covered windows with peepholes and ground to air radio.

ad7 ad6

The favored way of Helge to avoid unwanted contact while on a mission is under the hood of his Camaro and it is the 5.7 Liter V8 engine putting out 220 hp. When you hit the Nitro switch it will add another 200 hp instantly. This allows the car to do 0-200 km/h (124.27 mph) in 13 second burn, The War Camaro has served Helge and helped him to carry out his duties successfully for the last fifteen years.

For more on Helge Meyer (God's Rambo) and the War Camaro -search the Rhein Main Air Base Germany on the Facebook site.

 

ad1 ad2 ad3 ad4 ad5 ad9 ad11 ad12 ad13 ad15 ad16


What are the Top 10 Muscle Cars of All Time?


Get the breakdown, and see the action!




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Related on Muscle Car Fan





The 2017 Dodge Challenger GT Is the First AWD Muscle Car

For the last 50-plus years, muscle cars have been confronted with a basic problem: more power than traction. Thanks to low(ish) curb weights and rear-wheel-drive, even entry-level Camaros, Mustangs, and so forth can be convinced to burn rubber on cue. (We’d consider that a feature, not a bug, but that’s neither here nor there.)

Full article: https://goo.gl/AjRpeX

 

This Gorgeous and Rare 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 Was Once a Basket Case

The passion Bob Stokes has for cars was formed early. He drove his dad’s 1956 T-bird in high school, and he has owned a diverse array of classic and muscle cars since, from a 1963 Impala to a 1959 Rambler Cross Country station wagon he used as a hauler for his wife and two children. His interest in Oldsmobile muscle cars goes all the way back to 1970, when a friend going into the service needed to sell his 1967 Cutlass 4-4-2 Holiday Coupe. “He didn’t want to put it in storage, and I was in need of a good work car. He sold it to me for $1,200, and I have had the car ever since.”

Full article: https://goo.gl/xW56N9

 

Andy’s advice: 10 cars to buy while they’re still affordable

It has been an up and down year in the world of auctions with top tier collector cars such as the Jaguar D-type and rare racing Ferrari cars achieving some serious gains while cars that were hot a year ago, think the Ferrari Testarossa of the 1980s and ’90s and early Porsche 911 cars softening a bit. While that has been happening we have seen an upsurge in demand for muscle cars, notably ‘70s and early ’80s Pontiac Trans Ams and the like.

1960s American station wagons such as this '65 Buick, are No. 6 on Andy's better-buy-'em-now list

Full article: https://goo.gl/3wfWDi

 

Use These Paint and Bodywork Steps to Achieve a Show Car Finish

Despite the trend embracing the “don’t care” look of ratty muscle cars, nothing says quality like perfect paint. No, were not talking an exterior blow-over here. We mean paint that is crisp at every edge and blind corner, the kind that makes the vehicle look brand new. Getting there necessitates major disassembly, removing everything extraneous to the bodywork and going for perfection from there. The end result far surpasses the OEM level of detail. Thanks in no small part to today’s paint systems, such as the Axalta products used here, the result is eye-popping looks that dazzle and amaze.

1973 Camaro Bodywork And Paint

Full article: https://goo.gl/tmQKrc

 


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Related on Muscle Car Fan





Chrysler 300C 1957 images

The letter series Chrysler models are full sized personnel luxury cars focused on performance and built from 1955 through 1965. The letter designations are in many minds the beginning of the muscle car age. The new Hemi 392 (6.4 L) engine was available for the 1957 model year and there was a 390 cu in (6.5 L) engine putting out 390 hp (290 kW) on the table as well, but this is a rarely chosen option with only 18 units factory assembled. There were 1,918 coupes leave the assembly plant and for the first time,  there are also 474 letter series convertibles, produced in 1957.

Our thanks to Gateway Classic Cars for these images

Chrysler 300C 1957 (9) Chrysler 300C 1957 (10) Chrysler 300C 1957 (11) Chrysler 300C 1957 (12) Chrysler 300C 1957 (14) Chrysler 300C 1957 (15) Chrysler 300C 1957 (16) Chrysler 300C 1957 (17) Chrysler 300C 1957 392(13)


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Related on Muscle Car Fan





3 Great Retro Rides You’ve Never Even Heard Of

We all have our favorite automobiles from the golden age of muscle cars, and these cars are classics for a reason. However, it can never hurt to expand your horizons outside of the norm; heck, maybe you'll find a new ride to admire. This list will explore the rare, underrated, and unusual in the muscle car world, the ones that deserve attention the most.

1968 Dodge Hemi Dart

Image by cars-on-line.com

 

This car is a variant of the original Dodge Dart, which was made as a street-legal dragster. The Hemi Dart consolidated the high-performance engine and speed into a smaller frame. It was reported that only 80 of this model were built, and they came with a disclaimer that the car was not intended for street use.

1963 1/2 Ford Falcon Sprint

Image by Wikipedia

 

Essentially a prototype for the 1964 1/2 Mustangs that were made a year later, the Sprint didn't sell incredibly well, as it was overshadowed by Ford's other big releases in the 60's. It was, however, the only first-gen Falcon with a V8 option, which makes it a big deal to collectors. Additionally, just over 10,000 of these cars were ever produced.

1970 AMC Rebel Machine

Image by Wikipedia

 

Aimed for sales to the high-performance racer crowd, the Rebel Machine was one mean car. Only 2,326 of these were built before the Machine label was passed onto a new line of cars, but real fanatics still keep a place for the Rebel Machine in their hearts.


One thought on “3 Great Retro Rides You’ve Never Even Heard Of”



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Related on Muscle Car Fan





Dodge Charger 1966-1967 G1

The Dodge Charger arrived late in the 1966 model year although it was in the planning stages since the early ’60s with a prototype displayed throughout 1965 to test the public’s response to a new mid-sized personal luxury car. The Charger is on the Chrysler “B” platform with the Coronet, and they also shared the same chassis and front end sheet metal, but the Charger looked unlike anything else in the Dodge fleet. The new Charger sported an eye-catching fastback roofline, a departure from the ordinary for Dodge, but it did appear similar to the earlier released Rambler Marlin, on the outside.

Dodge Charger 1966 (9)

1966 Charger

It was luxuriously equipped with an entry level price of $3,100, substantially more than a Coronet and about $250 more than the Marlin with a similar fastback roofline. These two vehicles looked almost identical, and the press compared them with each other, with the late arrival surprise by Dodge being called a “nice looking Marlin.”  The Rose Bowl Parade opened with a 1966 Charger, and Dodge introduced it as the new leader in the Dodge Rebellion that year. The 1966 and the ’67 were the  only two years to have the triangular Fratzog emblem displayed on the grille as well as the trunk latch.

Dodge Charger 1966 (10)

The ’66 Charger had hidden headlights, the first time a Chrysler product used this feature since the 1942 DeSoto. The lights rotate a full 180 degrees so whether open or closed, they looked like one continuous piece with the electric razor-style grille. The six-lamp, full-width taillight configuration began where the roofline ends and the name Charger had chromed lettering emblazoned across the lamps.

Dodge Charger 1966 (6)

The sporty Charger was practical, and the upscale sedan has four bucket seats with a full-length center console. The buckets in the rear fold down and the console pad folded forward, offering the storage area of a station wagon. The driver had a simulated wood-grain steering wheel, 150 mph (240 km/h) speedometer, a 6000 rpm tachometer, and a shift stick mounted in the console. The dash had a full complement of gauges for fuel, alternator, and temperature in all units, but air conditioning or a clock were only available as options. The four, round, chrome-edged dash pods for the Charger didn't have regular bulbs; they were electroluminescence ones. Dodge Charger 1966 (8)

The first Charger wasn’t marketed as a high-performance muscle car, but the base came with the 318-cubic-inch (5.2L) two-barrel, or you could option the 361-cubic-inch (5.9L) two-barrel, or the 383-cubic-inch (6.3L) with a four-barrel. The 426 (7.0L) street Hemi made its cameo appearance just a few months before the Dodge introduced the Charger, and the owner could order this engine in 1966.

There were 37,344 Chargers made in ’66, with only 468 of those powered by the 426 Hemi. The base transmission is the three-speed mounted on the column, but a four-speed standard transmission or the three-speed automatic options were in the console.

Dodge Charger 1966 (2)

For 1967, the Charger signals are now in the fender and the easiest way to tell the two years appart on the outside. Inside, a regular-sized console replaced the full-length console, and if chosen, the center part doubled as a third front seat but the column shift was optional. Another new item for ’67 was a vinyl roof, and as for power, the 440 Magnum rounded out the options list. The sales dropped to 15,788 units in ’67 with only 27 of those equipped with the 426.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Related on Muscle Car Fan



Next Post



Related Posts