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Steve McQueen, The Chase, And The Bullit 68 Mustang GT

Steve McQueen has raised the stature of the Mustang GT more than almost any actor,except maybe the original 1974 Gone In 60 Seconds movie.
With outstanding chase scenes, the movie won an academy award for best editing. The chase scene alone is 10 minutes and 53 seconds of a 390/325 hp 68 Mustang GT, 4 speed fastback. The Mustangs' engines, brakes and suspensions were heavily modified for the chase by veteran car racer Max Balchowsky. Ford also originally lent two Galaxie sedans for the chase scenes, but the producers found the cars too heavy for the jumps over the hills of San Francisco. They were replaced with two 1968 375 hp 440 Magnum V8-powered Dodge Chargers. The engines in both Chargers were left largely unmodified, but the suspensions were mildly upgraded to cope with the demands of the stunt work.(wiki)
McQueen, an accomplished driver, drove in the close-up scenes, while stunt coordinator Carey Loftin, stuntman and motorcycle racer Bud Ekins, and McQueen's usual stunt driver, Loren Janes, drove for the high-speed part of the chase and performed other dangerous stunts. The Mustang’s interior rear view mirror goes up and down depending on who is driving: when the mirror is up, McQueen is visible behind the wheel, when it is down, a stunt man is driving.

The black Dodge Charger was driven by veteran stunt driver Bill Hickman, who played one of the hitmen and helped with the chase scene choreography. The other hitman was played by Paul Genge, who played a character who had ridden a Dodge off the road to his death in an episode of Perry Mason ("The Case of the Sausalito Sunrise") two years earlier. In a magazine article many years later, one of the drivers involved in the chase sequence remarked that the stock Dodge 440s were so much faster than the Mustang that the drivers had to keep backing off the accelerator to prevent the Dodge from easily pulling away from the Mustang.

The last remaining Charger and one of the two Mustangs were scrapped after filming because of damage and liability concerns, while the other was sold to an employee of Warner Bros.[26] The car changed hands several times, with McQueen at one point making an unsuccessful attempt to buy it in late 1977. The current state and location of the surviving Mustang is largely unknown, but it is rumored that the Mustang is kept in a barn somewhere in the Ohio River Valley by an unknown owner.[27] In late February/early March 2017, classic Ford expert Kevin Marti conclusively determined from the VIN and other identifying information that a 1968 Ford Mustang found in a Baja California Sur [Mexico] junkyard is in fact the movie set Mustang reported to be scrapped, and the new co-owners plan to have it fully restored in the U.S.(wikipedia)




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Oldsmobile 88 1958 Test Drive – Powered by 371 Rocket V8

We thought you might like to see this awesome 1950's American classic out cruising through the countryside. It's powered by the original 371 cubic inch Olds Rocket V8. This car features the most amazing set of taillights you'll probably ever see. It also has it's fuel filler hidden inside one of the taillights, much like some of the Chevy's and Cadillac's from that time. We hope you find it interesting, thanks for taking a look!


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Chevy small block- 1962 to 1998 Number 6

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The 4.0 inch bore family

350 variations 1967 to 1980

The L-48 is first available in the Chevy Camaro for the 1967 model year as the high performance engine option. This version was then an option in 1968 for the Nova and then in 1969 the engine is also available for the Impala’s, El Camino as well as an export product for the Holden in Australia from ’69 until 1972. In ’69 the L-48 package includes a Hydraulic camshaft, four barrel carburetor, cast pistons, and four bolt main bearings. The block has 010 as the casting number while the heads have either 041 or 186 casting identification number. This engine develops 300 hp and will offer 380 lb-ft (520 N-m) of torque. The compression due to the EPA mandate is lowered to 8.5:1 for the ’71 model year. From 1975 until 1980 the Corvette had the 350 L-48 V8 as the basic engine which produced 165 bhp (123 kW) for the ’75 model but it increases to 180 bhp in’76 through ‘77. By ’78 California and high altitude areas the L-48 offers 175 bhp while other areas the same engine will develop 185 bhp (138 kW). For 1979 the HP rating goes up to 195 but drops back to 190 bhp for the 1980 model year. By 1972 the Nova SS is the only other model with the L-48 four barrel and the car can be confirmed as an original factory Nova SS L-48 if the fifth character in the VIN is a “K”; ’72 is also the only year that a Nova SS pack can be identified with the VIN number.

The 350 cu in (5.7 L) LM1 package develops 155 to 175 hp is available in most Chevy passenger vehicles through to the 1988 model year. The four barrel carburetor is generally a Rochester Quadrajet and could be had with points, electronic and/or computer controlled power distribution through-out the years. The two barrel variation of the LM1 350 is the L65 which develops 145 hp; these two 350’s are superseded by the L05 for the 1989 versions.

From 1970 to ’74 the basic engine in the Corvette is the ZQ3 small block 350 with the four barrel Rochester 4MV carburetor, hydraulic lifters and 10.25:1 compression developing 300 bhp. The main bearing of the ZQ3 is the first 350 with the larger 2.45 journal. There is apparently a lower nickel content in small blocks cast after 1971but the deck is thicker to compensate while the heads are lighter with less iron in the casting but as a result they are more likely to crack than their predecessors-these units also have a lower compression of 8.51:1 which equates to a lower 270 bhp (201.34 kW) with the torque also dropping to 300 (net) lb-ft as well. In 1972 the ZQ8 will deliver 200 bhp net (149 kW) with 270 lb-ft torque; in ’73 an additional drop to 190 bhp (141.68 kW) although the 1974 model year the horse power rating goes up slightly to 195 bhp.

350 variations continued…


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