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Dodge Super-Bee 1968 to 1970

The first generation Super Bee was made from 1968 to 1970 and introduce to the public at the Detroit auto show in 1968. Plymouth Road Runner was selling so well that Chrysler Corporation decided the model needed some competition within the company. The Dodge division saw this as a chance to break into the muscle car market. The “super Bee” became the lowest priced vehicle offered by Chrysler Dodge Division - it was styled along the same lines as the Road Runner.

Dodge Super-Bee (3)

Outwardly the two cars are very similar; the Super Bee is slightly heavier - about 29 kg (65lbs) with a wheel base slightly longer at 300 c m (117”) as compared to the Road Runners 290 cm (116”).On the outside the Dodge has large wheel openings, fancy grill, and in the rear the Bee stripe with ornate tail lights. One other feature distinguishes the Dodge “Bee” and the Plymouth “Road Runner” the “Super Bee’ has three die cast chrome plated logo medallions; one on the rear of the car and two in front.

Dodge Super-Bee (6)

The dashboard instrument cluster and sophisticated gauges are similar to the Chargers. The car has heavy duty suspension on the high performance tires while on the body the tail section sports the distinctive Bee logo and racing stripe. The 1968 model came in a coupe body style only and was basically equipped with an automatic or you could have chosen the Mopar A-833 four speed or a floor mounted four speed with a Hurst Competition-plus shift stick and Hurst linkage. The basic engine available was a bi block 335 hp (250kW) 383 magnum developing 335 hp (250 kW) or you could kick it up a few notches and install a 426 Hemi with a 425 hp (317 kW) rating. There were only 125 of the hemi engine sold. For the big buck a big block 440 cu in (7.3 L) was also available with 390 hp (291 kW).

Dodge Super Bee 1970© Moonb007 | Dreamstime.com - 1970 Super Bee Photo

In 1969 a hardtop was offered besides the coupe along with an optional functional twin-scope air induction system mounted on the hood. The base engine remained a 383 high performance or you could choose from two optional engines; a 440 with three two barrel carbs or “Six-pack” and the high end 426 Hemi. This year saw a tax applied to all the muscle cars as well as any other vehicles with large fuel consuming engines. The sales went down in 1969 and continued a downward spiral into 1970 models.

Dodge Superbee 1970

With the 1970 model Super Bee came some cosmetic changes such as a twin loop front bumper Dodge christened “bumble bee wings” as well an optional - “c-stripe” variation of the bumble bee stripe on the trunk lid. Interior changes included high back bucket seats, a column mounted ignition switch, and a pistol grip style shifter handle on the optional four speed.

The second generation “Bee” saw a slight increase in sales over the first generation for the budget priced muscle car although only 22 units were sold with the hemi option; this option was shelved until it became available again in the 2007 Super Bee. This was the only year to offer a small block 340 cu in (5.6 L) which had 275 hp (205 kW) with only 26 units built.


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11 thoughts on “Dodge Super-Bee 1968 to 1970”


  1. great classic muscle car unlike the new so called muscle cars that car actually looks great

  2. First car that I saw the speedometer actually go past 130mph and still climb, I thought I was going to die, what exhilaration.


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Jaguar XKE Series I-1961 to “68

The XKE Jaguar was made between 1961 and 1974. This automobile is renowned for its good looks and high performance as well as moderate price. It rated as the top sports car of the 60’s and according to Enzo Ferrari when he first saw it – he referred to the “E” type as the most beautiful automobile he’d ever seen. The first model released was a two seat convertible roadster with a “2+2” seat version released in 1966 with a slightly longer wheel base than the roadster. The original car had only 12 units produce with only half a dozen or so left in good condition have made this a very expensive and very desirable collector’s item. The New York City Museum of Modern Art has a blue roadster in its permanent collection.
Series I
jaguar xke 1961
                            © Babar760 | Dreamstime.com - Jaguar XKE Coupe 1961 Photo
The Series I “E” type was produced from 1961 until 1968 and are powered by a 3.8 liter six cylinder Jaguar XK6 engine with a triple “SU” carburetor. The initial production car was made for export and not available in the U.K. until July 1961. The most sought after of this first production run are the earliest rare models with an external “bonnet “ (hood) latch requiring a special tool to open it as well these earliest models have  flat floor boards; a little latter into production the hood latch was moved to under the dash with the floor boards dish shaped to accommodate  peoples legs.  Leather upholstered seats are standard with leather/vinyl combination after ’63 and spoked wheels are an available option. The “E Type” features coiled rear suspension, with torsion bar front end, and four wheel disc brakes. The series one models can be identified by the glass cover over the headlights (until ’67), small grill opening, duel exhaust below the rear plate, with front  and rear turn signals above the bumpers.
In 1964 the 3.8 liter engine is up graded to a 4.2 liter version with increased torque while both engines producing 198 kW (265 bhp) brake horse power. Either engine accelerates the same and will do 0-97 km/h (0-60 mph) in about 7 seconds the increased torque of the 4.2 liter offers the operator better throttle response at lower rpm. Both engines are connected to a Moss four speed standard transmission but the 3.8 liter model does not have synchromesh into first gear while the 4.2 liter gears are fully synchromesh. The 2+2 coupe has a removable hard top and offered an automatic transmission as an option.
jaguar xke 1965
© Babar760 | Dreamstime.com - Jaguar XKE Coupe 1965 Photo
In March 1968 the “E Type” was changed slightly with the glass covering removed from the headlights and they are unofficially called “Series 1 ½” models. Also the dash switches changed slightly and the original three SU carburetors are changed to two Zenith- Stromberg carburetors for the U.S. bound models. Some of the Series 1 ½  cars have twin cooling fans and adjustable seat backs as well. Many of these changes are to conform to changing U.S. environmental and safety regulations but also is the gradual integration of features found on the Series II XKE. One of the changes made is the winged wheel knock off nut used on the U.K. vehicles requiring a special factory tool which was not allowed in the U.S. where the hexagonal nuts are required.  Many collectors have modified this “upgraded feature” back to the original knock off wing nut style. The hexagonal nut becomes a standard feature in the Series II and III vehicles.


2 thoughts on “Jaguar XKE Series I-1961 to “68”


    1. Henry
      tell what is a muscle car or what you would like to read-I will oblige you but for me I would say the XKE is a sports car with muscle and I like any vehicle that performs well-I like to offer my readers a VARIETY of knowledge on any vehicle with POWER-including lesser powered models of American cars to give an over view of the high profile models
      Web definitions-this is a British dictionary definition of “muscle car”
      Muscle car is a term used to refer to a variety of high-performance automobiles. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines muscle cars as “any of a group of American-made 2-door sports coupes with powerful engines designed for high-performance driving. …
      Thanks for the feedback Editor musclecarfan-you can call me Ross-or Joe-just don’t call me late for dinner


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Mustang 1968-2 bbl “A” code-by MCF Charles

Originally a 1968 289 2 bbl A code. Factory Meadowlark yellow and black standard interior with optional console.
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Total restoration was done completely by me in my garage and driveway. She came to me as a rust free example from southern Virginia. I completed the body work, stripped the existing paint, paint prepped, primed, painted the car in my favored color of 1967 Spring Time Yellow (more yellow pop). A complete upholstery kit including headliner were sourced from Laurel Mustangs as were bumpers, emblems and interior bright work pieces. A new windshield was needed, purchased and installed.
IMG_0506 IMG_0504
To achieve capable handling that these cars can achieve, I relocated the upper control arms, “invented” a twin front sway bar arrangement and installed with more than satisfying results. She carves corners like a pancake. KYB HP gas shocks keep everything predictable. The goal of this build was a reliable daily driver with capability for fun track days at Virginia International Speedway (pictured), the occasional stop light challenge, and road trips. I sourced a 1997 Ford Explorer 302 with the factory roller cam and GT heads. The motor is dressed to appear as it should circa 1968 with v belt pulleys, belts, etc. Ignition is Petronixs breaker less in the original distributor housing with matching 40K volt coil. Intake is Edelbrock performer matched with a Holley 600 cfm 4 bbl. Headman headers and Shelby style side exit exhaust round out the performance package. Lighting upgrades include 100 watt halogen hi beam, 55 watt low beams with relays. The entire car can be described as "Nothing radical”,but good and reliable.
The Stang rides on 15 x 7 inch Magnums 235/60/15 front and 15 x 8 inch Magnums 255/60/15 rear.
IMG_0505
I can furnish pictures of other builds, restorations, and related if you would like. Two recents are a 1967 Ford F100 short bed, a 1981 Chevy C10 short box style side, a 1989 Dodge d100 long bed and an 89 4X4 Power Wagon long bed.
The 67 Fastback is in process as I write. She is close to prime and paint. The 390 FE is on the stand awaiting a mild port job on the C8AE-H heads and a set of FE Mustang headers, (pricey). In time I will complete and send accompanying videos and photos. The Stang will be refinished in her original Burn’t Amber and Saddle Interior cools. This was an apparently rare paint color and even more rare when matched with the Saddle Interior colors. I spotted a 67 Fairlane at the Myrtle Beach Good Guys show in Burn’t Amber and Saddle and was completely thilled with my choice.Build goals are roughly the same as the coupe. Can’t love 'em if you can’t drive ‘em.

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For a short time in the late 60s, AMC built the Rebel—in two-door, four-door, and even station wagon variants. Unfortunately, the one-and-done Rebel only lasted four years before being phased out of the lineup. But in its last hurrah, AMC tacked on ...
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This ’68 Dodge Charger Is The Ultimate Pro Street Reboot!

For Dodge stylist Richard Sias, the 1968 Charger proved to be an amazing contribution to automotive history. A Michigan native who studied at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, Sias was a young man on a mission when he was given the directive to put body lines to the 1968 rendering of the car by his bosses at Chrysler’s design studio. Despite mis-pronouncements by some higher-level managers, his model prevailed as the one released in late 1967. Ironically, after this amazing project, he would leave Detroit soon after and never designed another OEM combination, eventually going to Boeing for decades where he put his talent on things like airplane equipment.

Full article: https://goo.gl/ewvLkg


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