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Dodge Dart 1969 “Swinger Style”

Take a look at this very nice 1969 Dodge Dart powered by a 318CID V8 and a A904 Torqueflite 3spd Auto transmission. The motor features 509/292 Cam, Demon 650CFM carb, new intake and headers. Rear end is a 8 3/4 with 3.91 gears and Moser axles. Power steering. This car is very clean inside and out!


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Buick Riviera 1963 images

The Buick Riviera is a personal luxury car that was in production continually from 1963 until 1999 with more than 1.1 million units leave the assembly line during that time. The Riviera is on a typical Buick cruciform frame, but shorter (208") than a standard Buick's and is also two inches narrower which means it is lighter, by about 390 lbs , than the LeSabre which weights in at 3,998 lbs. This model shares the other engines available for all Buick's lineup, but the standard would be either the 401 cu in or the 427 cu in and coupled with an automatic transmission.

MCF would like to thank Gateway Classic Cars for the images reproduced here

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Ford Motors V8 supplement FE & FT 3 of 4

The Mercury line-up only uses a 410 (6.7 L) FE engine from 1966 through ’67. The 410 combines the 4.05 inch bore of the 390 with the 3.98 inch (101.09 mm) stroke and a 10.5:1 compression ratio of the 428 which comes into production for 1966 as well.

64 galaxie 2

The 427 cu in (7.0 L) FE engine was a top pick from its introduction in 1963 at race tracks and enthusiasts followed by a host of performance enhancing equipment to help make them quicker. The 390 and the 427 have the same 3.78 inch (96.01 mm) stroke and the 427 bore size is 4.23 inches (107.442 mm). After you do the math this 427's firing chamber is actually rounded  up from 425 cubes for whatever reason. All of the 427 engines have a crankshaft balanced internally and solid lifters are used for every year other than 1968 when hydraulic lifters are installed at the factory.   The iron castings for the 427 engine block are thicker down the walls of each cylinder and on the deck to take the pressure plus the heat created in the firing chamber. The first 427 engines in ’63 are all top oiler to send cooling lubrication to the top end first, A side oiler system is available in 1965 which puts oil to the crankshaft first, much like the older “Y” block. These engines can be bolted to low, medium and high riser (heads) intake, but the cast iron manifold can also be upgraded to an aluminum one that could be mounted with a single four barrel carburetor or two four barrel units for a quicker ride. Ford never actually published specs on these engines, but this FE 427 will develop 400 hp (298.28 kW) or more with ease. Tunnel-port heads with matching intake ports were produced by Ford and these units do not cram the intake port between a pair of sleeved push rods that partly block the passage. The FE 427 engine had been designed with racing in mind and there was lots of other factory produced high performance equipment and a large quantity of aftermarket speed parts are still widely available.

1964 Fairlane 3

The valvetrain 427 side oiler Single Overhead Cam (SOHC) or the Cammer is Fords answer to the 426 Chrysler Hemi “elephant”. This engine is meant to assert Ford as the dominant player in NASCAR events from the start in the ’64 race season. The block is smaller and lighter than the earlier 427 with dimensions closer to the 392 FE. The deck height of this FE427 block is 10.17 inches (258.3 mm) more than a half inch less than the Chrysler 392 and the 4.63 inch (117.6 mm) bore spacing is less than the 426 Hemi’s 4.8 inch (121.9 mm). The Cammer has a lot going for it and durability of this side oiler FE427 block is proven time and again at NASCAR events. This engine uses an idler shaft to replace the camshaft and the camshaft bearing holes were plugged to complete the modification. This idler shaft is used to drive the distributer and the oil pump in the traditional manner, but the shaft also drive a six foot (1.8 Meter) long timing chain which powers the SOHC in each of the heads. The timing chain can be an issue to set properly-particularly when the engine is run in its highest range. The two single overhead camshafts are relocated above each of the heads to trigger the roller rocker arms mounted on a shaft or valvetrain. The cast iron heads have hemispherical combustion chambers-or Hemi-but this word is patented by Chrysler. The valvetrain has larger valves than on the Ford wedge heads engines and the exhaust valves are made of hollow stainless steel filled with sodium to prevent the valves from burning. The valves have dual springs and the SOHC system is highly rated for volumetric efficiency in the top rpm range. The high output ignition coil passes current to a dual-point distributor with an ignition amplifier that is transistorized to guarantee complete combustion. The 427 Cammer is a hand built engine, but Ford strongly recommends blueprinting them if it is to be used on the race track. The FE 427 Cammer with a four barrel carburetor (4V) will generate 616 hp (459 kW) @ 7000 rpm and a torque peak of 515 lb-ft. (698 Nm) @ 3800 rpm, but with two 4V carburetors the rating is upped to 657 hp (490 kW) @ 7500 rpm with torque peaking @ 575 lb-ft. (780 kW). The engine weights 680 lbs (308 kg) with the duel carbs and would have retailed for $2350.00 as a crate engine in 1968.

https://www.musclecarfan.com/ford-motors-v8-supplement-fe-ft-1of-4/

https://www.musclecarfan.com/ford-motors-v8-supplement-fe-ft-2-4/

4/https://www.musclecarfan.com/ford-motors-v8-supplement-fe-ft-4-4/

https://www.musclecarfan.com/ford-motors-v8-engine-series-mel-fe-ft-families-part-1-of-3-1958-76/

 

 

 


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Ford Galaxie 500-1964 images

From 1962 through '64 the Ford Galaxie 500 remains relatively unchanged, although in 1964, they are more sculpted and aerodynamic in attempt to make the overweight Galaxie more competitive in NASCAR events. The boxtop roof is now slanted more on the sedans & coupes in '64 and the 289 is the entry level offer for the 500XL lineup. There are also five other V8 engines on the options list, but the largest is the 427 cu in (7.0 L) and used in the light weight fiberglass body Thunderbolt.

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The Yenko Super Camaro L-78 And More!

In the muscle car era Ford, Chevy, and Mopars ruled the muscle car world.
In the mid 60's to 1970 these companies tried everything they could to have an advantage or be considered the fastest muscle cars around.
One such car was the Yenko Super Camaro.
The Yenk Super Camaro was built under the personal supervision of Don Yenko. The originals were all first generation Camaros and were built as a way to get around the GM rule that engines for the Camaro's of the time could not be larger that 400 cu inches.
For the first year of 1967, Yenko ordered L-78 equipped SS Camaros and swapped in the Chevrolet Corvette's L-72 427 in³ (7.0 L) V8. The cars came with a 4.10 rear end and heavy-duty suspension. The exact number of cars produced is 104. Yenko also installed a fiberglass replacement hood similar to the "Stinger" hood featured on 1967 big-block Corvettes.
For 1968 and encouraged by the success of the 1967 model, Yenko continued to produce his Yenko Super Camaros for 1968. All of the 1968 Yenko Super Camaros started life with the L78 396 in³ 375 hp (280 kW) hp engine and close ratio 4-speed Muncie transmission. They were all built as Super Sport cars but only the Yenko-ordered cars came with the 9737 COPO appointments which included a 140 mph (230 km/h) Delco speedometer, a special Magic Mirror trim tag and a large 1 1/8th inch front anti-sway bar. Yenko swapped out the factory 396 in³ short-block for the L72 427 in³ 450 hp (336 kW) short-block reusing all of the rest of the 396 in³ engine's components including the heads, carburetor, intake manifold, etc. He swapped the stock hood for a twin-snorkel fiberglass one he had made along with other features including Pontiac's 14"x6" steel wheels with special Yenko caps, Yenko emblems gracing the front grill, front fenders and tail panel and 427 emblems were added to the tail panel and front fenders as well. Other additions included a Yenko Super Camaro serial-numbered tag in the driver's side door jamb and Stewart Warner pedestal-mounted tachometer and gauges were installed in the interior. Early cars got a rear spoiler made for Yenko and later cars all got the factory spoilers front and rear. The recognized production number for these cars is approx 64 cars converted, with well less than half of that number known to exist today.
For 1969 For 1969, the dealership worked with Chevrolet to have the L-72 engines installed on the factory assembly line using a Central Office Production Order, or COPO. The orders included power disc brakes, a 4.10 Positraction rear end with heat treated axle shafts, (to avoid breakage), a Z-28 front anti-sway bar, and a heavy-duty 4-core radiator. Buyers of the car had the option of either the M-21 four speed or the Turbo Hydramatic 400 automatic transmission. A total of 201 cars were sold in 1969, 171 with four speed transmissions and 30 with automatic transmissions. Yenko rounded out the visual package with front and rear spoilers, a cowl-induction hood, special "Yenko 427" badges, twin stripes down the flanks and hood, (not with all cars however), and the sYc (Yenko Super Car) badge, (again, not with all cars). According to the Camaro Research Group, standard black interior (code 711) was the only interior ordered by Yenko.

Yenko
Yenko Camaro Big Blocks


8 thoughts on “The Yenko Super Camaro L-78 And More!”


  1. Very nice car I’m up sixties Camaro fan from way back not sure about that hood if its original to a Yenko of that nature I guess I would have to keep it otherwise it’s got to go and those rims are terrible


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